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Episode 20: #pfOldIsNew

Adrianna dress

 CrisWoodSews parasol dress

Helen’s Closet Ashton

Fibre Mood 15!!!!

Vikki Dress – similar to By Hand London Tamzin

White woman standing wearing mustard yellow sleeveless dress with gathered tiers and horizontal pleats on the skirt.
Black woman standing on the beach wearing sleeveless red dress with gathered tiers and horizontal pleats on skirt.

Pippa Dress

Line drawing of a dress with a pleated bodice, full skirt and thin straps.
White woman wearing brown dress with pleated bodice and tan blazer on top

Chloe Top

White woman sitting on grass wearing a blue top that ties on one shoulder and leaves the other shoulder is bare.   She is wearing light tan pants.

“Lizzo Orange Tiered Dress”

Large black woman wearing a one shouldered orange dress with several ruffled tiers and the tiniest purse ever.

Viola Top

Very thin white woman wearing a black gingham top and pants. The top has approximately one inch wide straps and a fitted bodice with a peplum.

Helen’s Closet Reynolds

#sewmystashsummer – Beverly’s hashtag which she isn’t even using

ABC News “The Truth About Where Your Donated Clothes End Up,” By MIKE LEE December 21, 2006, 11:55 AM

GreenAmerica.org, “What Really Happens to Unwanted Clothes? Your castoffs live on after your closet cleanout.” By Beth Porter

Washington PostDo you know what’s happening to your clothing donations?” By Amy Freeman, Jan. 28, 2020

Kleiderly.com “What happens to your clothing donations?” and “Why these African countries don’t want our clothing waste”

Edgexpo.com “Fashion Industry Waste Statistics”

Reference Notes:

  1. https://fashionunited.com/global-fashion-industry-statistics
  2. http://www.business2community.com/fashion-beauty/30-shocking-figures-facts-global-textile-apparel-industry-01222057#hBWEEKFemo8cCM9Q.97
  3. http://www.alternet.org/environment/its-second-dirtiest-thing-world-and-youre-wearing-it;  Forbes – Making Climate Change Fashionable – The Garment Industry Takes on Global Warming
  4. Timo Rissanen, “From 15% to 0: Investigating the creation of fashion without the creation of fabric waste,” Presenter, Kreativ Institut for Design og Teknologi, September 2005.
  5. http://worldwearproject.com/about-us/global-responsibility
  6. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_trade_of_secondhand_clothing
  7. http://www.smartasn.org/ | Secondary Materials and Recycling Textiles [SMART]
  8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1964887/
  9. United Nations Partnership on Sustainable Fashion and the SDG’s
  10. https://www.worldwildlife.org/industries/cotton
  11. Global Fashion Agenda – https://globalfashionagenda.com/initiatives/fashion-on-climate/#/our-impact
  12. thredUp.com, online resale – https://www.thredup.com/resale/#resale-growth

Other References:

Redress | The Positive Power of Fashion

4 replies on “Episode 20: #pfOldIsNew”

Loved this episode! So many good ideas on how to help decrease waste and help to save Mother Earth. I have a friend who worked at a thrift store. The didn’t take (or tossed) any garment without a tag. No handmade garments were displayed in the store. This was good information to have as a sewist. Also, I consider myself called out on making a garment from a 5x RTW shirt I found at a thrift store. I did not consider how unkind it might be to show the “before” photo. I have learned a lesson today. Thanks Jenny and Beverly!

Thanks so much for your thoughtful reply! It’s wonderful to know that something we said has made an impact on someone. Good for you for being willing to change your thinking. When we know better, we do better. 🙂

Just got to this session today! Excellent. Loved hearing what you are working on and how different you are from one another on your sewing journey. Really liked Beverly’s hack of men boxer shorts as a women that does not have an hour glass figure, the boxers solve the constricting waist problem. I wasn’t aware of Fiber Mood so thank you for that. Thank you for the discussion and references of thrift stores and where it all goes. I knew some of the material but not all. I am always conflicted 1) as someone who donates as I don’t want to throw away usable clothes but also don’t want to a burden on a well meaning charity and 2) as a shopper thinking what is the likelihood that what I want to purchase will be bought by another before it goes to other countries or landfills. Great discussion. Consignment stores have dates so you know how long an item has been there. Next time I go to Goodwill (probably next week i will see if they do something similar (never looked before).. so if i see an item that is almost at 4 weeks perhaps better to purchase it then it goes to another country … food for thought.)

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